Novel Writing – The Mentor and the Mentee

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In May 2015 I was lucky enough to be offered a place on The WoMentoring Project and receive a few weeks of mentoring from the lovely Louise Walters, author of the fabulous Mrs Sinclair’s Suitcase, and the forthcoming ‘A Life Between Us.’ (Due to be published February 2017). The support I received was invaluable and really helped shape me as a writer.

It was thrilling to recently get together with Louise to celebrate my book deal, and amongst the coffee, cake and talk about books, it was great to compare our experience of the project.

 

LJ: How did you hear about the WoMentoring project?  

LW: Twitter! I hear most of my bookish news through Twitter.

LJ: Me too – I’m using it more and more. Why did you want to be a mentor?

LW: I wanted to help other women to write. As soon as I heard about the project I knew I wanted to be involved. I know how hard it can be to find the time to write, to find the money for a critique, and perhaps most importantly, to find the self-belief. I also thought it would be beneficial to my own writing, and it has been. When I spot something that isn’t working, I often react with “OMG, I do that!” So critiquing others’ work is I hope mutually beneficial.  Why did you apply to the Womentoring project?

LJ:  I’d gone to a local writing group with the view to writing a non-fiction book. At the beginning of the meeting we were given a couple of words and ten minutes to write something. The bare bones of what is now Chapter One of The Sister was born. I spent the next few days thinking about Grace, my main character, and when someone from the group sent me a link to The WoMentoring Project and suggested I should apply and develop my writing I checked it out, and then discounted it straight away. I thought it was aimed at ‘proper’ writers. Not someone with no experience or qualifications, who had only scribbled down a few lines on a torn out sheet of a notebook. I bookmarked the page though. I’d noticed you on the list of mentors and having just finished, and fallen in love with Mrs Sinclair’s Suitcase, I felt really drawn to apply. It took days and days and a few glasses of wine before I felt brave enough to email, and I never dreamed I’d be accepted. Why did you pick me as your mentee? 

LW: I liked your writing and it was easy to spot your talent. I also spotted areas for improvement and I thought we might be a good match. The fact you live not a million miles from me helped too, as I thought it would be lovely to meet up. Also in your application you stuck to the word limits and applied as per the Womentoring Project instructions. I turned down other applicants because they didn’t do this.  How did the mentoring help?

LJ: Firstly, it gave me the confidence to try. When we first talked and I said I wanted to write a short story you asked ‘why not write a novel?’ as if I could, and I felt a real spark of ‘could I?’ That spark grew and grew until I scrubbed out the title of my story and wrote ‘Chapter One’ instead. Your offer to critique my first 10,000 words drove me forwards but I never quite believed I could write so much – having never written more than 200 words before, but I wrote and wrote until I had the first few chapters. I was euphoric! I sent them over to you half-expecting you to call and tell me they were so brilliant you’d sent them to your publisher! Of course, they weren’t good, as first drafts often aren’t.  You told me, so kindly, they’d be great as individual short stories but they didn’t flow like a novel should and I didn’t hesitate in deleting them.

LW: I had no idea you’d deleted all those words! I hope I wasn’t too blunt… it’s so important for writers who want to publish their work to grasp that a novel is more than a series of events… it’s the tale you weave around those events that makes a story, and makes a novel.

LJ: I went back to basics. I’ve always been an avid reader but I started to read like a writer instead, noticing the flow, the sub-plot, those subtle undercurrents and then I tried again, frantically trying to write another 10,000 before our mentoring period ended. The relief when you liked my second attempt was immense and I think that’s where mentoring was so beneficial. Getting that flow, that balance, is so critical. I feel so lucky I got the advice I did, 10,000 words in and didn’t spend the next 18 months writing a book that no-one would want to read. Did it take long to read and critique my work? 

LW: Longer than I thought it would, to be honest! I had to concentrate really hard!

LJ: You were very thorough. Were you comfortable with criticising?

LW: Yes, I think so. I know only too well how painful it can be to receive criticism, so I tried to remain constructive and positive, while at the same time be honest enough to be of decent help. I didn’t want to demoralise you. I was relieved to find that you were sure enough in your own aims and abilities to not necessarily agree with everything I suggested… Mittens, anyone??!!

LJ: Yes! You really didn’t like the cat in Chapter One and although I took most of your advice on board, the cat you didn’t like, stayed. I think building enough confidence to develop my own voice, trust my own instincts and not take things that aren’t working personally, has stood me in good stead to cope well with the inevitable rejections, and now the publisher’s edits. Writing in present tense is something I wouldn’t have dared try at the beginning as so many people don’t like it but by the time I’d finished the first draft in past tense, I knew I hadn’t written a book I’d love to read. That meant going back to the beginning and changing the tense, and then losing the last 40,000 words completely to change the genre. I feel like I’ve written more than one book during this process but I’ve honestly loved every second of it.

LW: Would you recommend the WoMentoring Project to other writing women?

LJ: Absolutely. It’s hard to believe that 18 months ago I’d never written any fiction except a couple of 100 word stories and now I’ve signed a three-book deal with Bookouture. My first novel, The Sister, will be out in July 2016 and I feel so grateful to Kerry Hudson for founding the WoMentoring Project and all the women who volunteer their time to help fledging writers find their voice.  I’m indebted to you for helping make my dream come true and I’m fully intent on paying it forward.

 

You can read my previous posts tracking my experience of the project here,  here and here.

 

The WoMentoring Project is still open for applications and offers free mentoring by professional literary women to talented up and coming female writers who would otherwise find it difficult to access similar opportunities.

Their mission is simple: to introduce successful literary women to other women writers at the beginning of their careers who would benefit from some insight, knowledge and support.

The hope is that new, talented and diverse female voices emerge as a result of time and guidance received from our mentors.

 

 

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10 thoughts on “Novel Writing – The Mentor and the Mentee

  1. I cannot recommend the WoMentoring Project enough. I worked with Louise (W.) and finally received friendly but objective and professional critique from someone inside the industry. I swear it made the difference that put my MS in the best position for securing an agent – which I did in late January!

  2. That’s pretty awesome! “I know how hard it can be to find the time to write, to find the money for a critique, and perhaps most importantly, to find the self-belief.” Self-belief is the kicker for me. If I don’t believe my work is valuable and that I CAN complete it, it will never get done. I love the idea of mentoring other writers. My desire is to do the same, coming alongside other women to help them reach their writing goals. Beautiful.

  3. Pingback: Writing Links Round Up 7/11-7/16 – B. Shaun Smith

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